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38 regular expressions found in this category!

Expressions in category: Email

Change page:   |    Displaying page 2 of 2 pages; Items 21 to 38
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
\w+([-+.]\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*([,;]\s*\w+([-+.]\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*)*
Description
Validates 1 or more email addresses. Email addresses can be delimited with either comma or semicolon. White space is allowed after delimiter, but not necessary. I needed this to allow my users to specify multiple email addresses if they choose to do so.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: The rating for this expression. Lewis Moten
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^[A-Za-z0-9](([_\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)@([A-Za-z0-9]+)(([\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)\.([A-Za-z]{2,})$
Description
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: The rating for this expression. mahesh mandhare
Title Test Details email address (RFC 2822 mailbox)
Expression
^((?>[a-zA-Z\d!#$%&'*+\-/=?^_`{|}~]+\x20*|"((?=[\x01-\x7f])[^"\\]|\\[\x01-\x7f])*"\x20*)*(?<angle><))?((?!\.)(?>\.?[a-zA-Z\d!#$%&'*+\-/=?^_`{|}~]+)+|"((?=[\x01-\x7f])[^"\\]|\\[\x01-\x7f])*")@(((?!-)[a-zA-Z\d\-]+(?<!-)\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}|\[(((?(?<!\[)\.)(25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|[01]?\d?\d)){4}|[a-zA-Z\d\-]*[a-zA-Z\d]:((?=[\x01-\x7f])[^\\\[\]]|\\[\x01-\x7f])+)\])(?(angle)>)$
Description
This accepts RFC 2822 email addresses in the form:<br> [email protected] OR<br> Blah &lt;[email protected]&gt;<br> <br> RFC 2822 email 'mailbox':<br> mailbox = name-addr | addr-spec<br> name-addr = [display-name] "<" addr-spec ">"<br> addr-spec = local-part "@" domain<br> domain = rfc2821domain | rfc2821domain-literal<br> <br> local-part conforms to RFC 2822.<br> <br> domain is either:<br> An rfc 2821 domain (EXCEPT that the final sub-domain must consist of 2 or more letters only).<br> OR<br> An rfc 2821 address-literal.<br> (Note, no attempt is made to fully validate an IPv6 address-literal.)<br> <br> Notes:<br> This pattern uses (.NET/Perl only?) features named group "(?&lt;name&gt;)" and alternation/IF (?(name)).<br> <br> See <a href="http://regexadvice.com/forums/permalink/26742/26742/ShowThread.aspx#26742">this regexadvice.com thread</a> for more info, including a version that does not use .NET features.<br> <br> RFC 2822 (and 822) do allow embedded comments, whitespace, and newlines within *some* parts of an email address, but this pattern above DOES NOT.<br> <br> RFC 2822 (and 822) allow the domain to be a simple domain with NO ".", but this pattern requires a compound domain at least one "." in the domain name, as per RFC 2821 (4.1.2).<br> <br> RFC 2822 allows/disallows certain whitespace characters in parts of an email address, such as TAB, CR, LF BUT the pattern above does NOT test for these, and assumes that they are not present in the string (on the basis that these characters are hard to enter into an edit box).
Matches
[email protected] | Name Surname <[email protected]> | "b. blah"@blah.co.nz
Non-Matches
name [email protected] | name."surname"@blah.com | [email protected]
Author Rating: The rating for this expression. Mark Cranness
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^\W{0,5}[Rr]e:\W[a-zA-Z0-9]{1,10},\W[a-z]{1,10}\W[a-z]{1,10}\W[a-z]{1,10}
Description
Simple email subject line matching. This regex matches those really annoying emails that begin with 0-5 spaces, followed by a fake reply, contain a random string of letters (usually CAPITALIZED) from 1-10 characters long followed by a comma, and then followed by three lower-case words each from 1-10 characters long. In my experience, the 3 trailing words are always lower-case. the words make begin with, contain, or end in common punctuation marks.
Matches
re: ASDFG, hours among lifestyle | Re: ASD34SSDF, i can't believe | Re: VZWENKS, the coffin brogade
Non-Matches
re: ASDFGASFDASDF, Hours among lifestyle | Re: ASD34SSDF, I can't believe it's true
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Joseph Lundgren
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^[\w-]+(\.[\w-]+)*@([a-z0-9-]+(\.[a-z0-9-]+)*?\.[a-z]{2,6}|(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3})(:\d{4})?$
Description
Matches a valid email address including ip's which are rarely used. Allows for a-z0-9_.- in the username, but not ending in a full stop i.e [email protected] is invalid and a-z0-9- as the optional sub domain(s) with domain name and a 2-7 char (a-z) tld allowing for short tld's like ca and new ones like museum.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. nick bennett
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^((\"[^\"\f\n\r\t\v\b]+\")|([\w\!\#\$\%\&\'\*\+\-\~\/\^\`\|\{\}]+(\.[\w\!\#\$\%\&\'\*\+\-\~\/\^\`\|\{\}]+)*))@((\[(((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9])))\])|(((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9]))\.((25[0-5])|(2[0-4][0-9])|([0-1]?[0-9]?[0-9])))|((([A-Za-z0-9\-])+\.)+[A-Za-z\-]+))$
Description
Email address validator. Should cover most of RFC 822, including unusual (but still valid) addresses. Does not restrict the top level domain size, but you're better off doing an nslookup or similar if you absolutely must have a valid domain. Accepts IP Addresses instead of the domain, with or without brackets. Believe it or not, this one is valid: !#$%^&amp;amp;amp;amp;*-+~/'`|{}@xyz.com Sorry looks like this site is mangling the quote and ampersand characters - you'll have to fix that yourself.
Matches
/A/Wacky/[email protected] | [email protected][1.1.1.1] | "blah b. blahburger"@blah.com
Non-Matches
./A/Wacky/[email protected] | [email protected][256.1.1.1] | -"blah b. blahburger"@blah.com
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Roger Ramjet
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^[email protected][^\.].*\.[a-z]{2,}$
Description
Most email validation regexps are outdated and ignore the fact that domain names can contain any foreign character these days, as well as the fact that anything before @ is acceptable. The only roman alphabet restriction is in the TLD, which for a long time has been more than 2 or 3 chars (.museum, .aero, .info). The only dot restriction is that . cannot be placed directly after @. This pattern captures any valid, reallife email adress.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Thor Larholm
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
\w+[\w-\.]*\@\w+((-\w+)|(\w*))\.[a-z]{2,3}$|^([0-9a-zA-Z'\.]{3,40})\*|([0-9a-zA-Z'\.]+)@([0-9a-zA-Z']+)\.([0-9a-zA-Z']+)$|([0-9a-zA-Z'\.]+)@([0-9a-zA-Z']+)\*+$|^$
Description
This regular expression is for admitting wild card searches on Emails the wild card character is * and in my case will only allow to do the search when the * is place after the first 3 alphanumeric characters. If you need to modify this behavior change the {3,40} to {n,m} where n is how many characters before the * and m is the total number if characters.
Matches
jdh* | jss.js* | [email protected]
Non-Matches
j* | js*
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Julio de la Yncera
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^((([a-zA-Z\'\.\-]+)?)((,\s*([a-zA-Z]+))?)|([A-Za-z0-9](([_\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)@([A-Za-z0-9]+)(([\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)\.([A-Za-z]{2,})))(;{1}(((([a-zA-Z\'\.\-]+){1})((,\s*([a-zA-Z]+))?))|([A-Za-z0-9](([_\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)@([A-Za-z0-9]+)(([\.\-]?[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*)\.([A-Za-z]{2,})){1}))*$
Description
This regular expression matches a series of names and/or email addresses much like you would do in Outlook's To field (e.g. To: [email protected];miles, er;roemer;lagrander, nitra). The first entry must be a name (in the form of last name followed by a comma and first name) or an email address. The following entries are a semicolon followed by one name or email address. The comma and first name are optional components of the name part.
Matches
rohrbach | rohrbach, wi | rohrbach, wi;roemer;[email protected];lagrander, ni
Non-Matches
rohrbach;miles; | rohrbach, wa; | [email protected];miles;;
Author Rating: Not yet rated. William Rohrbach
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^((?:(?:(?:\w[\.\-\+]?)*)\w)+)\@((?:(?:(?:\w[\.\-\+]?){0,62})\w)+)\.(\w{2,6})$
Description
Not a 100% email validation. It doesn't work with IP-Adresses, but it's good for most common cases. At least I hope so.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Sebastian Hiller
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
(?<email>(?![ ])(\w|[.])*@(\w|[.])*)
Description
E-mail addresses matcher
Matches
Non-Matches
arnoldschwarz
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Manpreet Grewal
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+(?:\.(?:[a-zA-Z0-9_'^&amp;/+-])+)*@(?:(?:\[?(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?))\.){3}(?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\]?)|(?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]+\.)+(?:[a-zA-Z]){2,}\.?)$
Description
this will validate most legal email addresses, even allows for some discouraged but perfectly legal characters in local part; allows IP domains with optional []; keeps final tld at a minmum of 2 chars; non capturing groups for efficiency
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Micah Duke
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^([\w\-\.]+)@((\[([0-9]{1,3}\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([\w\-]+\.)+)([a-zA-Z]{2,4}))$
Description
Expression 1 of 2 used to check email address syntax.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. David Lott
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^((?&lt;DRIVE&gt;[a-z]:)|(\\\\(?&lt;SERVER&gt;[0-9]*[a-z\-][a-z0-9\-]*)\\(?&lt;VOLUME&gt;[^\.\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?&lt;&gt;:|\\/][^\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?|&gt;&lt;:\\/]*)))?(?&lt;FOLDERS&gt;(?&lt;FOLDER1&gt;(\.|(\.\.)|([^\.\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?|&gt;&lt;:\\/][^\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?&lt;&gt;:|\\/]*)))?(?&lt;FOLDERm&gt;[\\/](\.|(\.\.)|([^\.\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?|&gt;&lt;:\\/][^\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?&lt;&gt;:|\\/]*)))*)?[\\/]?$
Description
Verify &quot;well formed-ness&quot; of DOS or UNC paths. Passed over 170 NUnit test, (took 3 complete rewrites) Components of a path: DRIVE:=[a-z]: SERVER:=[0-9]*[a-z\-][a-z0-9\-]* FNAME:=[^\.\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?&lt;&gt;:|\\/][^\x01-\x1F\\&quot;&quot;\*\?&lt;&gt;:|\\/]* VOLUME:=FNAME UNC:=\\SERVER\VOLUME ROOT:=(DRIVE|UNC) FOLDER:=.|..|FNAME FOLDERS:=FOLDER?([\]FOLDER)*[\]? PATH:=^ROOT?FOLDERS?$
Matches
his is a very 'long' folder\that is.part of 2 folders. | b\c\..\x. | \\Dads\Mp3\FileName1\.\TestDir2
Non-Matches
\\1.dads\C | \. folder\ | .ext
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Tristen Fielding
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^\w+[\w-\.]*\@\w+((-\w+)|(\w*))\.[a-z]{2,3}$
Description
Email validation. With this short expression you can validate for proper email format. It's short and accurate.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Eric Lebetsamer
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^[a-z0-9][a-z0-9_\.-]{0,}[a-z0-9]@[a-z0-9][a-z0-9_\.-]{0,}[a-z0-9][\.][a-z0-9]{2,4}$
Description
for validate a email, but with this regex it 's possible : [email protected]_.....____---.com
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Laurent J
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^[\w-\.][email protected]([\w-]+\.)+[\w-]{2,4}$
Description
This expression matches email addresses, and checks that they are of the proper form. It checks to ensure the top level domain is between 2 and 4 characters long, but does not check the specific domain against a list (especially since there are so many of them now).
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Steven Smith
Title Test Details Pattern Title
Expression
^([\w\d\-\.]+)@{1}(([\w\d\-]{1,67})|([\w\d\-]+\.[\w\d\-]{1,67}))\.(([a-zA-Z\d]{2,4})(\.[a-zA-Z\d]{2})?)$
Description
This pattern allows standard e-mail addresses (e.g. [email protected]), sub domains (e.g. [email protected]), the new two- and four-letter domains (e.g. [email protected] and [email protected]) and country codes (e.g. [email protected]). Also, this patter follows the Network Solutions standard length of 67 characters for top-level domains. The reason I allow numbers to be entered in the domain suffix is for future planning. If you do not want numbers to be able to be added as a domain suffix (e.g. [email protected]), simply delete the last two occurrences of &quot;\d&quot;.
Matches
Non-Matches
Author Rating: Not yet rated. Laurence O'Donnell
Change page:   |    Displaying page 2 of 2 pages; Items 21 to 38

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